Posts for tag: periodontal disease

By Ottawa Smiles Dental
August 13, 2019
Category: Oral Health

Have your gums started to look a bit different? Have you noticed that your teeth don’t feel like they properly fit together when you bite down? Even subtle smile changes like these could be warning signs of gum disease, alerting you that should turn to our Holland, MI, dentist, Dr. Todd Brower, as soon as possible. Read on to learn more about gum disease, its symptoms, and how Dr. Bower can help.

What is gum disease?

Also referred to as periodontal disease, this bacterial infection can evolve from solely affecting the gums to harming both the jawbone and teeth if left untreated. Gum disease isn’t noticeable at first, causing very subtle and often missed changes in your smile; however, as the infection progresses, you may start to notice issues.

What are the different stages of gum disease?

Gum disease ranges from gingivitis (the early stage) to necrotizing periodontitis (the advanced and most serious stage). Gingivitis is usually the mildest form, and it can often be reversed with proper at-home dental care and by turning to our Holland, MI, family dentist every six months for professional dental cleanings. By keeping the gums free from plaque and bacteria, we can prevent gingivitis from turning into full-blown gum disease.

The next stage of gum disease development, chronic periodontitis, is the most common form of the condition and is usually when symptoms start to surface (which we will discuss further below). Adults over the age of 35 are especially at risk of this chronic periodontitis.

The final manifestation, necrotizing periodontitis, is the most serious form of gum disease, as it can destroy ligaments, tissue, bone, and teeth. This condition is more common in those who smoke as well as those who are malnourished or have compromised immune systems.

What are the warning signs?

In the initial stages, the only changes you may notice are red, puffy gums or gums that bleed when you floss/brush. Bleeding gums are a telltale sign that should not go ignored. If gingivitis is not treated, it will lead to receding gums, exposure of tooth roots (which often leads to sudden tooth sensitivity), loose teeth, and eventually, tooth loss. A dental professional should evaluate any of these symptoms no matter how minor they may seem.

How can I protect myself against gum disease?

Gum disease might be scary, but it is 100% preventable with proper care. Along with visiting your dentist every six months for cleanings and checkups (which also include gum disease screenings), you should also be brushing at least twice a day and flossing daily. Eating a smile-friendly diet can also reduce your risk for gum disease.

Concerned? Give us a call

Is it time to schedule your six-month dental cleaning? If so, call Ottawa Smiles Dental in Holland, MI, today at (616) 399-3600 to book your next visit. These simple cleanings could protect your gums and teeth from cavities and gum disease!

By Ottawa Smiles Dental
April 02, 2017
Category: Oral Health
GumDiseaseCouldAffectMorethanYourTeethandGums

If you have periodontal (gum) disease, it's important for you to know its effects aren't limited to your mouth. A number of studies demonstrate gum disease can affect the rest of your body — and what may be going on elsewhere could likewise stimulate gum disease.

Here are 3 diseases or conditions that seem to share a link with gum disease.

Diabetes. This chronic disease results from the body's inability to interact properly with insulin, the hormone necessary for turning glucose (sugar) into energy, or producing enough of it. There's clear evidence that having diabetes increases your risk of gum disease and vice-versa. If you have diabetes, it's important that you keep it under control for your gum's sake as much as for your overall health.

Cardiovascular disease. Like diabetes, this group of heart and blood vessel diseases has a related characteristic with gum disease: inflammation. This natural function of the immune system limits tissue damage caused by disease or injury. But in both CVD and gum disease, inflammation can become chronic and itself cause damage. Further, some types of bacteria associated with gum disease can contribute to a higher risk of CVD. Minimizing gum disease occurrence with good oral hygiene could positively impact your risk of CVD.

Pregnancy. While certainly not a disease, pregnancy does trigger hormonal changes in the mother that in turn could elevate her risk of gum disease, particularly pregnancy gingivitis. Not only does this pose problems for the mother's teeth and gums, some studies connect gum disease to the increased possibility of early, pre-term birth. A sharper focus on dental care during pregnancy not only benefits the mother but may also be important for the health of the baby.

These aren't the only conditions that can be affected by gum disease: others like osteoporosis, respiratory disease or rheumatoid arthritis also share links with the disease. If you have any systemic condition like these, it pays to be extra vigilant in preventing and treating gum disease.

If you would like more information on periodontal (gum) disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Good Oral Health Leads to Better Health Overall.”

4ReasonsWhyYouMayNeedtoSeeaPeriodontistforYourGumDisease

After treating you for periodontal (gum) disease for some time, we may suggest you see a periodontist, a specialist in gum conditions and diseases. There are a number of reasons for a referral, including the specific type of gum disease you may have developed.

Here are 4 more reasons why seeing a periodontist might be advantageous at this stage in your dental care.

Advanced treatment. All dentists are skilled in basic treatment procedures for gum disease, particularly removing plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) that cause and sustain infections. But if your disease has advanced deeper below the gum line and has resulted in infection-filled void pockets between teeth and gums or in gum recession (the tissues shrinking back from the teeth), you may need more advanced techniques and equipment provided by a periodontist.

Advanced Cleanings. Regular, twice-a-year office cleanings are part of every dental care program. But depending on the severity of your gum disease (and your own hygiene efforts) you may need more frequent and advanced cleanings to keep recurring infections at bay. A periodontist can provide this, as well as help you develop a daily hygiene plan that meets your needs.

Your general health. There are a number of systemic conditions like diabetes, cardiovascular disease or pregnancy that can affect gum health. Many of these issues are tied to tissue inflammation, a major component of chronic gum disease, as well as slower tissue healing. As specialists in the gums and their relationship with the rest of the body, a periodontist can develop a treatment approach that coordinates with these other health issues.

Future restoration preparation. One of our treatment goals with gum disease is to try to prolong the life of natural teeth for as long as possible. In reality, though, some or all of your teeth may have a shortened life expectancy. If a comprehensive dental restoration is in your future, a periodontist can help prepare your gums for the inevitable. They may also be able to repair or restore gum tissues that enhance the appearance of a restoration to create a more attractive smile.

If you would like more information on advanced treatment for periodontal disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Referral to a Dental Specialist.”